About Historic Foggy Bottom

The Foggy Bottom Historic District sits on approximately three acres in the heart of the nation’s capital. First platted in 1768, Foggy Bottom soon became the site of the city’s light industry and its nearby factories encouraged a cluster of working-class homes, which are preserved and lived in today. The neighborhood is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
George Washington statue in Washington Circle.
George Washington statue in Washington Circle.
In the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Irish, German and African-American laborers helped shape Foggy Bottom and the rest of Washington, sharing a pride of craftsmanship and the dream of a better life in America. According to the National Park Service, “Foggy Bottom was described in those days as being low and swampy with fogs settling in over the river banks and mixing with smog from the gas works.” In addition to this quiet enclave of private residences, Foggy Bottom includes such noted institutions as the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, the U.S. Department of State, the Organization of American States, the Watergate complex and The George Washington University. Arts in Foggy Bottom is proud to contribute to the neighborhood’s storied legacy.  
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